Mbeki analyses state capture’s crippling impact

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Mbeki analyses state capture’s crippling impact

Former President Thabo Mbeki delivered a critical assessment of state capture’s devastating
effects on South African institutions during the annual lecture at the University of South
Africa (Unisa) on Wednesday night. Mbeki drew from the Nugent Commission and Zondo
Commission reports to illustrate how entities like SARS and Eskom were systematically
undermined, jeopardizing the nation’s economic stability.

“The Zondo Commission looked at the outcome of the Nugent Commission of Inquiry on
SARS, and they said we agree with what that commission said and its outcome,” Mbeki
stated. “This is one of the extraordinary conclusions in the Zondo Commission report. It says
one of the people who played the leading role in the efforts of destroying SARS was the
president of the Republic of South Africa.”

Mbeki pointedly added, “It says in terms of all the evidence it received, that the president of
the republic, made certain that he was one of the leading people in terms of the SARS and
Eskom processes. And of course, we know who the president was, and it says so in black and
white that Jacob Zuma was part of the processes to destroy SARS.”

Reflecting on this paradox, Mbeki remarked, “It is a bit of a conundrum, that you would have
the president of the republic destroy an institution that gives them the means to govern.”

Mbeki further delved into an analysis by former Institute of Race Relations CEO Dr. John
Endres, which divided South Africa’s history into three ages: 1994 to 2007, 2008 to 2022, and
the current third age. Endres warned that if the government fails to fulfil its duties and rectify
the situation, South Africa could be “lost in the hands of the private sector and NGOs,” citing
examples of citizens taking matters into their own hands due to inadequate service delivery.