In Mpumalanga, the first cholera patient dies

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Government preparedness for NHI implementation has improved, President Ramaphosa says
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Eskom’s rating remains at ‘B’ from Fitch Ratings, with a stable outlook
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In Mpumalanga, the first cholera patient dies


The first instance of cholera was discovered in Mpumalanga, and the patient, sadly,
died, according to a Thursday statement from the National Department of Health.

According to a brief statement, the deceased was a 73-year-old female from Phake
Thabeng in Dr JS Moroka.

According to the department, the elderly woman complained of diarrhoea, nausea, and
vomiting after having a meal during the day and was admitted to Mmametlhake Hospital
on May 26.

“She was a known patient on hypertension treatment. A cholera sample was taken and
forwarded to the laboratory for investigation. The interim result showed cholera
positive.”

On Tuesday, May 30, the woman passed away at the hospital in Hammanskraal.
Since the cholera epidemic in Hammanskraal, north of Pretoria, 25 people have died.
One death each in the Free State and Mpumalanga, with 23 deaths coming from
Hammanskraal.

“Members of the public are urged to remain vigilant and exercise personal hygiene,
while those experiencing cholera symptoms are urged to present themselves to the
nearest health facility,” the NDoH said.

According to the Mpumalanga Health Department, the NDoH has subsequently sent an
Outbreak Response Team to Dr JS Moroka to look into potential infection origins, track
down contacts, and run extensive community awareness efforts.

Cholera, one of the diarrheal illnesses brought on by the Vibrio cholera bacteria, is one
of the diseases for which communities are urged to remain on high alert.

Symptoms include sudden diarrhoea, which is painless, watery diarrhoea (rice stool),
nausea and vomiting, and fever among children, and some individuals do not feel ill.
The disease spreads through the ingestion or drinking of contaminated water with
human faeces.


The illness, according to the department, may start from a few hours to five days of
infection.


“Anyone who presents with diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting should immediately seek
medical assistance at the local health facility.”

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